Editorial

Dearth of female Nobel Prize winners shows the fight for equality is far from won.

Dearth of female Nobel Prize winners shows the fight for equality is far from won.

It has been a blast putting together this edition of our favourite paper, Honi Soit. From the antics of Bob Ellis to the intrigue of learning about drag kings, this week has been enlightening.

A stand out theme this week is strong women and the influence they have in society. It takes a lot of courage to don short shorts and a cow boy hat, and thrust repeatedly on stage to a room of screaming girls.

Julia Gillard also gets a mention for her impassioned tirade against Tony Abbott during question time last week. We explore the role social media played in forming various social opinions on the speech.

Closer to home HoniLeaks explores the changes to Affirmative Action in the Sydney University Law Society. While the club moves to reduce the influence of AA, Honi finds evidence to show that women are still under-represented in law practices.

In strong contrast our profile this week of Bob Ellis presents a different story about the role of women in society. Ellis’ claims that feminism has “destroyed the world, secondly the world economy, and now it’s coming after Australian freedom of speech” makes us wonder if he has a point, or if he is just a little crazy.

We also welcome our new undergraduate Fellow of Senate, Patrick Massarani, who is keen to make his mark on the university during his two year term. It is interesting to note however that there are currently no female student representatives on the Senate. While there is a strong female representation of women in the higher positions of the SRC and the University of Sydney Union, we must ask ourselves, have women achieved equal recognition to men in all leadership roles at The University of Sydney?

This week we also discuss the Nobel Prize winners that have caused controversy. Our reporters believe that the EU and Haroche & Wineland did not deserve the Peace and Physics prizes respectively. So we put forward some awards of our own, which should be less controversial.

Again under representation of women is concerning, with very few female Nobel Prize winners this year.

Have a great week.

Filed under:
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