Editorial: Indigenous Edition

It is both a privilege and a pleasure to be able to deliver a newspaper packed full of our culture to you, our readers. It is my hope that this inaugural edition of Indigenous Honi will found a tradition that will continue to provide students with an opportunity to develop a richer appreciation for Indigenous cultures and…

Artwork by Emily Johnson. Artwork by Emily Johnson.

It is both a privilege and a pleasure to be able to deliver a newspaper packed full of our culture to you, our readers.

It is my hope that this inaugural edition of Indigenous Honi will found a tradition that will continue to provide students with an opportunity to develop a richer appreciation for Indigenous cultures and understand the complexity of Australia’s First People.

Whether you’re a regular Honi reader, have a special interest in this issue, or were simply drawn to this paper by our incredible front cover: Welcome! You’re in for an exciting ride!

For any minority, the struggle to find a voice, to secure an audience who will listen, to transform injustice-induced anger into constructive solutions – it’s a real challenge. To have earned the right to produce our own Honi is such a feat and being granted the honour of our first Editor-in-Chief has been eventful, memorable and fiercely rewarding to say the least.

This edition of Honi is quite incredible. We’re showcasing amazing Indigenous artists, writers and non-Indigenous writers, united by the common goal of acknowledging, celebrating and sharing the wonders of Indigenous Australia. I’m so proud of all of the contributors who ventured beyond their comfort zone into new territory for the sake of their people today and for our future together. I think it takes a certain bravery, combined with curiosity and the will to improve the lives of others to accept the request to be part of something so monumental and significant as Indigenous Honi.

Importantly, I would like to use this space to give my most sincere thanks to Justin Pen, Judy Zhu and Julia Readett for their undying support of Indigenous Honi since its conception. Honi Soit is a beautiful beast of near-infinite proportions and your help, assistance and reassurance has had a profound impact on the final product and my ability to bring it all together.

The Koori Centre has seen a massive influx of new students this year and your readership is a celebration of this huge, next step in nurturing Indigenous education and encouraging our empowerment. I’m so glad to have the chance to share all of these wonderful artworks and articles with our community at the University of Sydney!

It is so important to expose yourself to opportunities to learn and break down the barriers that prevent us from developing societies founded on equality and respect, so thank you for picking up this copy of Indigenous Honi.

Vice Chancellor Michael Spence.

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