Letters //

Thumbs down to Q&A protestors

A letter from Chaneg Torres.

honi-letter-yay

Dear Honi

On behalf of all mainstream students on campus, I would like to express my disappointment at the juvenile antics of the extreme left on Q&A.

 Many of those who engaged in such churlish behaviour that evening were unfortunately students of Sydney University and are thus an embarrassment to the majority of the student body.

In this democracy, we pride ourselves in our freedom to dissent strongly against government policy that we disagree with. No one is denying their right to protest. But it wouldn’t hurt to lift the level of discourse beyond a leftist banal call for free stuff. These radicals have done nothing except attract ridicule, as well as to hurt their own message.

Nothing is for free: everything has a cost. It is unfair for these privileged lefties who so often spend their time asking everyone else to check their privilege to ask the majority of Australians who don’t go to university to subsidise the majority of the cost of their university education. University students on average have the capacity to earn higher incomes. With no one having any intention to remove the HECS scheme where every dollar can be borrowed from the government and paid back in the future, surely privileged Sydney University students can in the long run afford to contribute more to the cost of their education.

In my opinion, many of the recommendations under consideration from the Kemp Norton review, if adopted, should see an Australian tertiary system that is accessible, fair and of higher quality. Already Minister Pyne has shown a passion for reform and is to be commended for this.

At least there is some sensible policy engagement by the centre left. But unfortunately, the radical left wing (5th, 6th, 7th, 8th year Arts??) students on Q&A get a kick out of professional activism and perpetually living off the taxpayer, so I won’t be holding my breath for considered policy engagement with them.

Yours in deregulation and efficiency cuts,

Chaneg Torres

BPESS III

President, University of Sydney Conservative Club

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