Lists //

The Fourth Estate

It’s unsurprising that, among the ranks of USyd’s many student journalists, the modern media is an enduring source of fascination and intrigue. In today’s reading list, we bring you a series of articles that look at the best (and worst) of contemporary media and its practitioners. The Peril of the Pen Over the last few…

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It’s unsurprising that, among the ranks of USyd’s many student journalists, the modern media is an enduring source of fascination and intrigue. In today’s reading list, we bring you a series of articles that look at the best (and worst) of contemporary media and its practitioners.

  1. The Peril of the Pen

Over the last few months, people around the world have looked on in horror as a growing number of journalists have been imprisoned, injured, and assassinated while doing their jobs. The names James Foley, Peter Greste, and Steven Sotloff are now familiar to all of u s- but, as Nerine Corbett knows all too well, their stories are just the tip of the very treacherous iceberg that is international war journalism.

  1. An Australian in New York

Ask pretty much any aspiring journalist which publication they’d most like their byline to appear in, and odds are pretty good that they’ll reply, in hushed, reverent tones, “The New Yorker”. For most USyd students, this dream is unlikely to ever become a reality. But, in this profile, Hannah Ryan speaks to former USyd student Amelia Lester who, at 26, was appointed the managing editor of this international media icon.

  1. Virgina in da Hauss

After building a successful career as one of the nation’s foremost political commentator on the premise that “’women can have it all”, Virginia Haussegger reached 37 and realised she’d been wrong. Here, she speaks to Georgia Kriz about her rise to media prominence, her good mate Julia Gillard, and why she’s so against third wave feminism.

  1. Hijacked is the antithesis of student journalism

Earlier this year, the Honi Soit editorial team found itself barraged with calls and emails from Hijacked, an online media platform marketing itself as a champion of student voices and student stories. They wanted to publish our content on their website, supposedly to help us distribute it to a wider audience than we already had. After doing a bit of research, we told them to fuck off.  Here, we explain why, and what we think student journalism is really all about.

  1. The survival of the fittest

When The Saturday Paper arrived on the Australian media landscape earlier this year, it immediately positioned itself as a challenger to the tired old mastheads whose decline and eventual death seem increasingly imminent. It seems appropriate, therefore, that at the head of this paper sits, not a 60 year-old veteran of the Australian media industry, but 25 year-old media insurgent Erik Jensen. Here, he speaks to Tom Joyner.