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Five things everyone did in the ‘90s that would be weird if you did now!

Only people who are able to travel back in time to the 1990s will get this

 

1. Heading down to the shops to rent a video

It might seem like only yesterday that you’d head down to the nearest Blockbuster or Video Ezy to rent a VCR to catch up on a film. Those days are long gone. VCRs are redundant and movies are now far more easily accessible over the internet.

2. Listening to music on your Discman

At the time, the Discman seemed like an easy way to listen to music on the go. However, the invention of MP3 players and other digital music storage devices have seen the Discman relegated to a historical novelty.

3. Failing to recognise South Sudan as a sovereign nation

 

In the ’90s, you’d have been hard-pressed to find anyone arguing that South Sudan was in fact an independent sovereign nation. That has all changed in recent years since the country’s referendum and admission to the UN in 2011. Even Ecuador (hardly a trendsetter) recognised South Sudan’s independence back in 2015.

4. Voting for Paul Keating

Image result for paul keating 1993 campaign

 

It seemed like people just couldn’t get enough of voting for Paul Keating in the 1990’s (especially in his victorious 1993 election). Keating retired from politics in 1996 after losing the Prime Ministership. These days, even the most nostalgic of misty-eyed left wing voters would be unlikely to vote for Keating, manually adding his name and a preference box to the bottom of their ballot papers.

5. Being 20 years younger than you are today

Unless you weren’t born yet, everyone these days is around twenty years older than they were in the ’90s. The main exceptions are people from Hollywood-style age reversal scenarios (we’re thinking Benjamin Button or 17 Again) – a very small minority.

Additional reporting by Izabella Antoniou

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