Yu-Gi-Oh fans cry out against persecution of duel citizens

Senator Yugioh appeared on the ABC's Q&A last week.

Yugioh duel citizens

The citizenship scandal currently gripping the Australian parliament has had unforeseen consequences for players of the popular trading card game Yu-Gi-Oh. The debate in parliament has spilled out into the community, and public opinion has turned against these innocent duel citizens.

“It’s an absolute tragedy, a rorting of the democratic process,” says local MP for Blade Bay, Jack Bidaman. “It’s fundamentally un-Australian. How do we know where their loyalty lies? It’s bad enough that we’ve got Kiwis in the House of Reps and Canucks in the Senate. Now we’ve got these zealots spreading their strange preoccupations through the community. Blue Eyes White Dragon? That sounds like a rank in the KKK. What’s next – a Pokémon player as Prime Minister?”

The Garter spoke with Hugo Exodia, human rights lawyer and prominent figure amongst the duel citizen community. Exodia stresses understanding and tolerance, and says that Australians have nothing to fear about duel citizens in the community.

“My father had an inappropriately dark-type based deck and so I was born in the Shadow Realm. It’s not my fault that his strategy was inappropriately predicated on trap cards. I’m just a normal, average Australian, who just happens to be possessed by the spirit of a vengeful ancient Egyptian pharaoh obsessed with trading card games. This government needs to wake up to itself and realise that their hateful rhetoric about who can or can’t sit on parliament or play a monster card in defence mode has deeper implications. We need to work together so that all our life points are adequately protected.”

Vice Chancellor Michael Spence.

Michael Spence

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