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Damascus is burning

Damascus is burning

Alex Downie investigates the impact of the Syria conflict – there and in Australia

The realities of violence

The realities of violence

Domestic violence in LGBTIQ relationships is more pervasive than it’s made out to be, writes Georgia Behrens.
Additional research by Madeleine King

Last Rights: Euthanasia in Australia

Last Rights: Euthanasia in Australia

When viewed through the lens of personal experience, euthanasia no longer looks like a tokenistic civil right

Another brick in the wall

Another brick in the wall

Felix Donovan and Michael Rees on gated communities and exclusion

A gay Christian’s dilemma

A gay Christian’s  dilemma

I was on a hot date. A few nights ago, a charming gentleman invited me to dinner at one of Sydney’s finest restaurants. Not only was he a solid 10, he was intelligent, cultured and witty. Although that didn’t last long. Upon hearing that I was a Christian, his jaw dropped, and his fork crashed […]

Things Got Hot Before The Revolution

Things Got Hot Before The Revolution

Speculation about a person’s sexuality does not sit well with me, but it is essentially what Queer History is all about. Before the Wom*n’s History movement was able to examine the experience and influence of women in History, it first had to uncover their existence. This is about the stage we are at with Queer […]

Smashing the fash: fascism in Australia

Smashing the fash: fascism in Australia

Authoritarianism, nationalism, and, ultimately, fascism are not ghosts of the past, but real existing tendencies in Australian politics.

Praying the gay away

Praying the gay away

Georgia Kriz writes about her day with a gay conversion therapist

My day at Villawood

My day at Villawood

Anjali Vishwanathan spoke to the ones left behind

Jumping the gun

Jumping the gun

John Gooding woke up this morning, printed himself a gun

You only live once

You only live once

Felicity Nelson doesn’t want to die, she wants to #YOLO like a jellyfish – forever

Zelda, New Zealand and outer space

Zelda, New Zealand and outer space

In my darkest of moments, when I can smell the impending doom of climate change, outer space is there as a saving grace. But space should not be the final reserve of the human race, but an extension of our inquisitiveness. There is no bliss in being forced to go somewhere, as asylum seekers can attest to.

Rough sleepers: homelessness in Sydney

Rough sleepers: homelessness in Sydney

Jeremy Elphick is lying in the gutter, looking at the stars.

Death 2.0

Death 2.0

Thomas O’Brien reflects on death in a digital age.

Too soon to tell: Iraq, 10 years on

Too soon to tell: Iraq, 10 years on

Nina Hallas looks back at the war that should never have been

Silent Sexuality: Pedophilia, child sex abuse, and discourse

Silent Sexuality: Pedophilia, child sex abuse, and discourse

TRIGGER WARNING: THIS ARTICLE DISCUSSES CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE. Ben Brooks examines the discourse of paedophilia and child abuse, and why we need to break the taboo of discussing child sexuality.

Chinese whispers: the Dalai Lama and Sydney University

Chinese whispers: the Dalai Lama and Sydney University

“Education Matters” was the proposed name of a speech to be given by the Dalai Lama on the importance of learning to Sydney University students on campus this June. The irony is that in light of recent events, critics are now saying the University administration is more interested in business matters than education matters. A […]

Winning hearts, ‘likes’, and retweets

Winning hearts, ‘likes’, and retweets

Felix Donovan explains how Obama’s social media campaign has inspired Julia Gillard

Out of focus

Out of focus

ADHD was once thought to only afflict children, but the illness is increasingly being diagnosed in adults. Caitlin Still explores the issue.

Shedding light on Mormonism

Shedding light on Mormonism

Avani Dias writes about her experience of Mormonism in Utah

Selfish charity?

Selfish charity?

Georgia Behrens questions the virtue of voluntourism in the developing world

Hontiki recommends: North Korea

Hontiki recommends: North Korea

North Korea is a very real, yet very different, tourist destination. Perfect for the blog updates and Facebook statuses!

The British are coming

The British are coming

The Guardian has been one of the few newspapers to make a successful transition from daily paper to online news source. Madeleine King asks whether the British giant will help or harm the frail Australian media scene.

A lecture on lectures

A lecture on lectures

Early in our interview, Professor Stilwell muses, “Good teachers can determine the trajectories of [our] lives.” Stacks of manila folders occupy his impressive wooden desk. These pillars stand as monuments to a lifetime of research. It’s a weighty – if not ironic – statement, given the growing malaise towards traditional educational models. Universities have long […]

Walking off the job…

Walking off the job…

It has been almost a decade since members of the National Tertiary Education Union (NTEU) last went on strike at Sydney University. In 2009, the NTEU threatened to strike on two occasions, only to cancel strike action at the eleventh hour when the University’s administration agreed to back down on proposed changes to pay and […]

The year that was…

The year that was…

They say hindsight is 20/20. Honi asked a number of Australia’s news makers for their take on the events of the past twelve months.

Off the main drag…

Off the main drag…

Lucy Watson gets down and dirty to discover the dreams and desires of local drag kings.

God vs. Gays

God vs. Gays

The likes of Jim Wallace do not speak for the queer religious community, writes Curtis Dickson, while a silent revolution has begun to purge homophobia from the Middle East, writes Fahad Ali.

Divided They Fall

Divided They Fall

Australian politics is broken, but will true progressives heed the call and form a new party? Something’s gotta give, writes Felix Donovan.

Bitcoins

Bitcoins

The end of fiat currency, or just another nerd fad, ask Rafi Alam and Mason McCann.

Weight Expectations: the pressure to be thin

Weight Expectations: the pressure to be thin

The stress of university can leave students vulnerable to contracting an eating disorder. Sydney University needs to provide greater social support, writes Alexandra Christie.

Polar peril

Polar peril

They’re the terrifying hybrid of polar and grizzly bears, ‘Grolar’ bears are growing in number, and they’re on the move. William Haines finds out what happens when the animal kingdom adapts to global warming.

Down The Drain: Financial Mismanagement at Sydney University

Down The Drain: Financial Mismanagement at Sydney University

Financial mismanagement, shady contracts, and executive salaries led to the purging of academic staff, reports Madeleine King.

24 Hour New Weird Party People

24 Hour New Weird Party People

Sydney’s nightlife is experiencing a renaissance of activity fuelled by a surge of local artists, music lovers and eccentric party organisers; where the DJs play all night long. Angus Farrell takes us on a tour of just a few of the people behind the good music and great times in Sydney.

Yes, in my backyard: Sydney rebuilds its mojo

Yes, in my backyard: Sydney rebuilds its mojo

In a selfish city with significant infrastructure problems, NIMBYism has been a loud and at times influential force. But not everyone shares the cynicism toward development. Michael Koziol meets the residents and reformers urging on the transformation of Sydney.

The Gun Show

The Gun Show

From the Norway massacre to the murder of Trayvon Martin, Ben Brooks chronicles the use and misuse of firearms in a world which continues to tolerate their inevitable consequences.

Student activism: Paris ’68 to Sydney ‘12

Student activism: Paris ’68 to Sydney ‘12

The wind is back in the sails of the protest movement. Tim Scriven and Morgan Gardiner look at student activism around the world, in Australia and at the University of Sydney.

The Rise of the Right

The Rise of the Right

The hunt for scapegoats has seen far-right parties surge in popularity in Europe. While far-right parities have always been a part of European tradition, the emergence of remodelled far- and extreme- right parties in the past decade, and the increasing palatability of these parties, is seen by many as the alarming rise of fascism, writes Jackson Busse.

Smash the rich, save the base

Smash the rich, save the base

While the history of Chinese communism is complex, a little polishing makes the parallels with contemporary Australian political life shine through. A few years ago, I was walking down Eastern Avenue with a senior journalist from a major Chinese news organisation when we were approached by a couple of Socialist Alternative (SA) leafleteers. The SA […]

I want to be a Superhero

I want to be a Superhero

They’re the self-appointed guardians of our streets, patrolling the suburbs and fighting crime. Rob Morrison embarks on a journey to become his own real life Superhero and discovers there’s something far greater being represented here than just adults playing dress-up.

The Hard Times

The Hard Times

It’s a tough time for print media. With the rivers of gold long dried up, digital in a state of flux, and the news cycle more complex than ever, now out newspapers face the threat of further regulation. Nick Rowbotham looks to the future after Finkelstein.

Shooting to kill: time to rethink the Taser?

Shooting to kill: time to rethink the Taser?

The recent death of a Brazilian student stunned by a Taser has failed to change perspectives on Tasers as non-lethal alternatives to guns, writes Eleanor Gordon-Smith. The question is not whether they quell crime. For guns, too, quell crime. The question is whether they are truthfully a non-lethal alternative to handgun use.

An Education Revolution?

An Education Revolution?

In the battle to absolve the national crisis of education inequality, Tech for Australia picks our best and brightest graduates and sends them to the most disadvantaged schools. There’s just one thing – they’re not teachers. Edwin Zorilla looks at a program that divides as much as it conquers.

Riding the Tech Wave

Riding the Tech Wave

Innovative. Entrepreneurial. And all aiming to stike it big. James Alexander shines the spotlight on the surging number of Sydney University students founding tech startups.

Fukushima fall out: Japan one year on

Fukushima fall out: Japan one year on

“Yes, even by Koriyama standards, this is cold,” the cabbie says cheerfully, snow-laden winds buffeting the windscreen. I’m in northern Japan, Fukushima Prefecture, to attend a meeting between a group of Tokyo lawyers and local farmers. A group of schoolgirls on bikes struggle past in skirts and socks, and a small, morbid part of my […]

Money Changes Everything

Money Changes Everything

While universities are required to consult student organisations about how the Student Services and Amenities Fee should be spent, they have no obligation to pass any of it on to student unions, councils, or other organisations. Adam Chalmers investigates where your money might end up, amid ongoing tension between the student union and the university.