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Droning on about animal welfare

Droning on about animal welfare

An animal welfare group’s use of surveillance drones is set to pose an unprecedented challenge to Australian trespass and privacy laws. Rights group Animal Liberation has recently announced that it will use an airborne surveillance drone to monitor farmers’ treatment of their livestock. Executive director Mark Pearson told the ABC that drones will facilitate the […]

Thatcher, the Iron Lady? More like the dyin’ lady …

Thatcher, the Iron Lady? More like the dyin’ lady …

Evan Van Zijl looks at Thatcher’s immediate legacy

No laughing matter

No laughing matter

According to recent psychological research, sexist jokes make sexist people

News in Revue: Week 5, Part 2

News in Revue: Week 5, Part 2

Mariana Podesta-Diverio is stuck in a gore-tex vortex

News in Revue: Week 5, Part 1

News in Revue: Week 5, Part 1

Henry Innis doesn’t dance to the beat of the EAG’s drum

Department of Corrections: Fark Ta

Department of Corrections: Fark Ta

Jaimie Summerfield discovers that there is no city of “Fark Ta” in Thailand, it was simply a typo

US student paper has sex edition censored

US student paper has sex edition censored

Lucy Watson investigates the shutdown of a New mexico student newspaper following the publication of controversial content

ANU victim to embezzlement

ANU victim to embezzlement

Nick Rowbotham reports on an embezzlement scandal at the Australian National University Student Association

Ballet, Russia and acid attacks

Ballet, Russia and acid attacks

Sergei Filin was a principal dancer for Moscow’s famous Bolshoi Ballet; he is now its artistic director. At 11pm on January 17, Filin was attacked as he walked from his Mercedes to his apartment building in Moscow. The attacker’s face was covered as he threw a vial of sulphuric acid at Filin’s face. Losing his […]

The right reason to hate college

The right reason to hate college

Issues of sexism aside, it’s the inequality embraced by the colleges that we should condemn the loudest. A former colleges student explains why she is angry

A Parliament of jellybeans

A Parliament of jellybeans

Ben Brooks sat through question time and counted the jellybeans

Where your money went: SSAF

Where your money went: SSAF

Cameron Caccamo explains changes to funding for student organisations

Department of corrections – The Daily Telegraph believe in Ghostz

Department of corrections – The Daily Telegraph believe in Ghostz

It’s time to take a master class from veteran Daily Telegraph reporter Richard Noone, who on February 18 had a story with the following headline published under the so-called ‘News’ section

Forgive me, Facebook, for I have sinned

Forgive me, Facebook, for I have sinned

Alexandra Christie explores the Post Secret fad that is taking over the university sphere.

Shedding light on Mormonism

Shedding light on Mormonism

Avani Dias writes about her experience of Mormonism in Utah

Interview with the Bureaucrat

Interview with the Bureaucrat

Rafi Alam was supposed to do a normal interview with Kerri-Ann Jones, but shit got meta

Crazy Fringe Belief Activism Pages

Crazy Fringe Belief Activism Pages

Lachlan Munro explores three of the most insane Facebook activism pages

Death with dignity

Rafi Alam puts the proposed euthanasia bill into perspective

Right to silence laws weakened

Right to silence laws weakened

In NSW, right to silence laws have been changed. Hannah Ryan and Andrew Bell explain the cause for concern.

EXCLUSIVE: USU CEO’s letter to staff on how to break picket line

EXCLUSIVE: USU CEO’s letter to staff on how to break picket line

The CEO of the USU, Andrew Woodward, has sent a letter to staff detailing how to break the picket line.

‘Sluts’ and Sunrise

‘Sluts’ and Sunrise

Hannah Smith looks at the sexist narratives that continue to plague media commentary

Seymour Centre gets seedy

Seymour Centre gets seedy

Don’t enrol your daughter in RG Dance, warns Samantha Jonscher

The Pope of new hope?

The Pope of new hope?

Andrew Bell makes his predictions for the new papacy

Structural problems in architecture faculty

Structural problems in architecture faculty

In late February, the Faculty of Architecture, Design, and Planning abandoned a promise made to students to maintain the number of scheduled class contact hours in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture.

Honi Advocates: international students’ rights

Honi Advocates: international students’ rights

Honi Advocates aims to shed light on a particular policy or problem that we believe has been under-examined by the mainstream media. The first issue we would like to explore is international students’ rights.

News in Revue

News in Revue

Caitlin Still is in tune with the news

Department of Corrections – Tales from the Telegraph

Department of Corrections – Tales from the Telegraph

As the Herald switches to tabloid, The Daily Telegraph goes even more tabloid.

Fiction, capitalism, and being a winner

Fiction, capitalism, and being a winner

Caitlin Still takes a look at the myth behind the competitive nature of sport. Does the emphasis on winning in our sporting culture force competitors to take drugs?

Justice cannot exist in a police state

Justice cannot exist in a police state

This campaign and protest is not just about Jamie Jackson or even the poor behaviour of the police force in the recent Mardi Gras period, these are merely the straws that broke the camel’s back.

A tainted strike

A tainted strike

We should all stand strong with the threatened staff of our university. Jobs, and the lives, of those that provide us with an education unfounded anywhere else are at risk. This is the primary issue at stake. But let’s support this cause maturely and sensibly.

The politics of skipping class

The politics of skipping class

Don’t be a hypocrite: support the strike.

A protest, on the protest

A protest, on the protest

My classes were cancelled today and apparently my education is the National Tertiary Education Union’s (NTEU’s) to sacrifice at their will. While I do not completely disagree with some of the NTEU’s grievances, we should, at the very least, question the ethics of a group of individuals who believe that the education we are paying for belongs to them.

Uni-Verse: UQ

Uni-Verse: UQ

Adam Chalmers’ article about UQ is QI

News in Revue: S1 W2 2013

News in Revue: S1 W2 2013

Bro Reveleigh wrote this on opium

International students taken for a ride

International students taken for a ride

Ezreena Yahya reports on the latest in international students’ rights

Uni-Verse: Time to face the music

Uni-Verse: Time to face the music

Georgia Behrens reports on dissonant reforms at the ANU School of Music

Critique: No, Prime Minister

Critique: No, Prime Minister

The ratings are in, and they’re not looking good, writes Neha Kasbekar

Da Fuq? Raiders of the Lost Mail

Da Fuq? Raiders of the Lost Mail

Samantha Jonscher investigates a case of mistaken addresses

It’s not always sunny over the rainbow

It’s not always sunny over the rainbow

Let it rain on my parade, says Evan Van Zijl

Boot camp

Ben Brooks reports on members of the Defence Force marching in the Mardi Gras

Department of Corrections: the Pope’s blessing

Department of Corrections: the Pope’s blessing

John Gooding critiques the SMH’s occasionally bizarre efforts at journalism

Drop dead gorgeous

Drop dead gorgeous

Tom Raue sexes dead people.

NUS: Power without glory

NUS: Power without glory

Rafi Alam ran from the National Conference with flailing arms

Zoe’s Law

Zoe’s Law

Lucia Osborne-Crowley reports on a bill that would grant greater legal protection to the foetus

Arts vs. Science? Por qué no los dos?

Mischa Vickas philosophises about the eternal battle between discplines

Uni-Verse: La Trobe activists face expulsion

Three Victorian students are facing a secret trial, reports Tom Raue

NUS a Toothless Tiger?

NUS a Toothless Tiger?

Does the National Union of Students (NUS) still have any relevance? Nick Rowbotham skipped Melbourne’s laneways, lattes and giant balls of yarn to sit in on the annual conference of Australia’s peak student representative body.

Crane Collapses at UTS site

Crane Collapses at UTS site

A crane has collapse at the UTS construction site, causing major damage and traffic delays. James O’Doherty reports. ; University of Sydney student Steph Swanson was there as the cage caught on fire. She told Honi Soit she saw flames and smoke bursting from the crane, before calling 000. ; At 10am, the arm of […]

When the old boys would rather feed their nostalgia than address institutionalised misogyny

When the old boys would rather feed their nostalgia than address institutionalised misogyny

In the wake of the resignation of all but one of the fellows of the St Johns College council at the University of Sydney, a college student writes about the alumni who would rather turn a blind eye than address problems within the system.

In America, Grand Old Party struggles amid progressive tilt

In America, Grand Old Party struggles amid progressive tilt

Amid ominous signs for conservative America, Riordan Lee asks where to now for the Republican Party?

A cautionary tale

A cautionary tale

The big lesson from the Presidential debates is that they’re useless, writes Ben Winsor in New Jersey.

Purge the prudes and talk plainly

Purge the prudes and talk plainly

Political correctness is a growing cancer, writes Zachary Thompson.

The Second Showdown – Biden vs Ryan

The Second Showdown – Biden vs Ryan

  Biden is the definition of folksy, when the debate turned to Israel he said he’d known ‘Bebe’ personally for 29 years – Bebe being Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Biden has a winning smile and an ability to make you feel like he’s only talking to you. Whether it’s when he talks directly into […]

The revolution kicks on

The revolution kicks on

The renewed reign of Chavez can bring good to Venezuala, if the leader is willing to compromise, writes Fabian Di Lizia Hugo Chavez has been re-elected comfortably in the Venezuelan Presidential election, returning 55 per cent of the vote to Henrique Capriles’ 44 per cent. International commentary suggested Chavez’s working-class and peasant bases would fragment […]

Why award mediocrity?

Why award mediocrity?

A Europe that doesn’t stand for anything stands for nothing, writes John Harding-Easson.

Natural gas buses – cleaner alternative or potential fireballs?

Natural gas buses – cleaner alternative or potential fireballs?

Your daily commute on the 440 could turn disastrous. Chiarra Dee investigates.

Nationhood must mean more than beer, sports, and Anzacs

Nationhood must mean more than beer, sports, and Anzacs

In a piece which won the Honi Soit 2012 opinion competition, Ben Brooks contemplates the meaning of modern Australia.

Limbo of the Left

Limbo of the Left

Where are the great storytellers and heroes of the Left, asks Yitzi Tuvel. This piece came second in the 2012 Honi Soit opinion competition, judged by Joe Hildebrand.

Don’t sack Alan Jones

Don’t sack Alan Jones

Knee-jerk hysteria does little to promote civility, says Angus Reoch

A Right to Leave the Party

A Right to Leave the Party

By refusing the sick the basic right to die, we condemn the desperate and demean ourselves, writes John Gooding. This piece came third in the 2012 Honi Soit opinion competition, judged by Joe Hildebrand.

Don’t call me baby!

Don’t call me baby!

Robert Grigor hates pet names.

Welcoming the pink dollar

Welcoming the pink dollar

Josh Sprake wants Australia to cash in on gay marriages.

Bottoming out on Oxford Street

Bottoming out on Oxford Street

The Golden Mile is dead, writes Matthew Endacott.

Fuck the glitter, I’m not proud

Fuck the glitter, I’m not proud

Nick Richardson wants to separate personal identity from sexuality.

How homophobia affected me

How homophobia affected me

My own struggle with intolerance and discrimination taught me that things really do get better, writes Isabelle Cox.

No end to the right to discriminate

No end to the right to discriminate

Religion will retain its privilege to reject gay students and others, reports Michael Koziol.

At UNSW, Labor teams up with hard-right Liberals in close election

At UNSW, Labor teams up with hard-right Liberals in close election

In an election expected to be the closest in many years, why is a John Robertson staffer stitching up with far-right Liberals? Michael Koziol reports.

Muslim students concerned for religion’s reputation

Muslim students concerned for religion’s reputation

The weekend’s events were not representative of Islamic culture , writes Lawrence Muskitta.

Journo challenges Sheridan on truth

Journo challenges Sheridan on truth

The knives are out in the history wars, reports Michael Koziol.

Down the barrel of a gun: why we fight for Afghanistan

Down the barrel of a gun: why we fight for Afghanistan

We are here to help and we’re there to stay, writes Patrick Morrow.

Who wants to live forever? We do

Who wants to live forever? We do

It’s in humanity’s best interest to stave off death for as long as possible, writes Adam Chalmers

Why inequality is not necessarily bad

Why inequality is not necessarily bad

There is no inherent harm to the rich getting richer, says Sam Murray.

We should not pursue happiness

We should not pursue happiness

It is far from the most useful emotion, writes Lane Sainty.

Income management a wrong turn on the road to reconciliation

Income management a wrong turn on the road to reconciliation

Punitive policies do nothing to foster relationships between Indigenous communities and service providers, writes Lovelle D’Souza.

Censure motion stifles speech

Censure motion stifles speech

USU board members must express their views, writes Tim Scriven.

Post-apartheid mistakes haunt South Africa today

Post-apartheid mistakes haunt South Africa today

Economic self-determination failed to accompany social revolution and now the consequences are apparent, writes Fabian Di Lizia.

View from the voting booth: an election day diary

View from the voting booth: an election day diary

1am Saturday – It has become apparent that other parties have been tearing down our posters from poles. We are too tired to retaliate. Final blitz of distributing resources to booth captains and then home. 7am – Setting up at Forest Lodge. There is a sea of green – Clover has co-opted The Greens’ branding […]

Cuts to NSW Independent school funding imminent

A bill slashing funding to Independent schools could be tabled before the end of the year. James O’Doherty reports

Political correctness not black or white

Political correctness not black or white

Election commentary remains one of the last bastions of racial profiling, writes John Gooding.

Houston, do we really have a problem?

Houston, do we really have a problem?

The conversation surrounding asylum seekers has concentrated on finding a solution. But what exactly is the problem we are trying to solve, asks Poppy Burnett.

Patriarchy: they’re having nun of it

Patriarchy: they’re having nun of it

The Leadership Council of Women Religious (LCWR) has gathered to respond to the Vatican’s criticism, writes Nathan McDonnell.

Redefining rape harms discourse and victims

Redefining rape harms discourse and victims

Politicians’ ‘gaffes’ can’t be excused as ignorance, writes Justin Pen.

Local bordello met with mixed reviews

Local bordello met with mixed reviews

Behind a drab exterior lies what will soon be one of the largest brothels in Australia – and it’s just a stone’s throw away, write Laura Hanlon and Zoe Morse.

Hang Territory drunks out to dry

Hang Territory drunks out to dry

When it comes to government regulation of alcohol, consistency can’t be everything, writes Michael Koziol.

Curiosity lives on as space luminary is remembered

Curiosity lives on as space luminary is remembered

Ben Brooks looks back on the life of Neil Armstrong.

Tobacco industry’s challenge deemed only hot air

Tobacco industry’s challenge deemed only hot air

  Nick Findlater reports on the recent High Court decision the Government applauded but detractors say means little Last Wednesday August 15, a majority of the High Court rejected a challenge to the Tobacco Plain Packaging Act. The challenge had been led by Japan Tobacco, with British American Tobacco and Philip Morris (among others) joining […]

Laws will stop the boats, but should we?

Laws will stop the boats, but should we?

Why do we send refugees to the islands of the damned, asks Dan Zwi.

Tequila shots and cigarettes are the spice of life

Tequila shots and cigarettes are the spice of life

When all liberty is gone, we will regret nanny-state laws, writes Sean O’Grady.

MediaBOTCH: missing the most vulnerable

MediaBOTCH: missing the most vulnerable

Max Chalmers investigates why rental affordability will not be an issue at next year’s election

Discrimination lawsuit failing to lift hopes for accessible transport

Discrimination lawsuit failing to lift hopes for accessible transport

With RailCorp facing a civil lawsuit over inconsistent audible announcements on services, Virat Nehru reports on the wider problem Disability Discrimination Commissioner Graeme Innes’ action against RailCorp went before the court on Monday, over the rail authority consistently failing to provide audible announcements on trains. When Honi Soit went to print, the outcome of the […]

Gladiators in the ring, activists out of it

Gladiators in the ring, activists out of it

We can’t take the politics out of sport, and nor should we want to, writes Rafi Alam.

FIGHT CLUB: the United States Studies Centre

FIGHT CLUB: the United States Studies Centre

The United States Studies Centre is the premier department in the country for American studies. But its teaching style and course structure don’t please everyone. Lane Sainty and Angus Reoch fight it out.

Why Queerspace Autonomy?

Why Queerspace Autonomy?

The autonomy debate rages on, but the voices of those who need it most still aren’t being heard, writes Anonymous.

No half-measures in banning smoking, says tobacconist

James O’Doherty visits Sol Levy, tobacconist of choice for the university’s former Vice-Chancellor Sol Levy Tobacconist – James O’Doherty Evelyn Platus, manager and fourth generation proprietor at Sol Levy tobacconist on George St, thinks the smoking ban at Sydney University hasn’t gone far enough. At least, she thinks the administration should stick to its guns. […]

Born to work? Not for the Boss

Born to work? Not for the Boss

Wayne Swan’s emphasis on employment as a core value sells Springsteen short, writes Shaun Crowe in Canberra.

Say no to new Confucianism

Say no to new Confucianism

In the spiritual laboratory that is modern China, secular pluralism should win out against new Confucianism, writes Professor John Keane.

Regional newspapers get a raw deal

Country rags may be trash, but they’re our trash, writes Lane Sainty.

America undermines arms treaty

America undermines arms treaty

America’s gun problem isn’t just domestic, writes Felix Donovan.

Campus feminism faces radical rethink of priorities

Campus feminism faces radical rethink of priorities

When women’s issues are played out via Clubs & Societies, how do we know progress when we see it, asks Connie Ye.

No bandaid for drinking culture

No bandaid for drinking culture

Attempts to motivate the public into action cheapen the problem of violence, writes James O’Doherty.

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