Editorial: Uni fails all sexual harassment victims

editorial-harassment

Earlier today, we published an article titled “Uni fails sexual harassment victim”. We posted a link to the piece on Facebook at 1 pm. Within 5 hours, the article had been viewed over 4,000 times. Within those same 5 hours, the University and other parties contacted the Students’ Representative Council (SRC) – the organisation that prints and funds Honi Soit – expressing concerns over the perpetrator being identified in the article. It is unclear if there is any legal basis to these concerns. It appears to be an amorphous group of complaints, concerned with his “safety” and “privacy”. None are related to claims of defamation.

None of the complainants have alleged any factual inaccuracy, or made any mistake as to the veracity of our reporting. Rather, the University is worried with us naming him and identifying his place of work, which, itself is associated with the University.

The editorial team was obliged to obey the instructions of the SRC. We, however, strongly disagree with the concerns raised by the University and the orders given to us by the SRC.

We are disappointed and infuriated – though, perhaps not surprised – with the University’s chosen course of action. Where it had it dragged its heels for six months – assisted the victim only after repeated prompts, forced her to organise and conduct her own mediation sessions, and failed to discipline the perpetrator (suspending him; banning him from campus; firing him from his position of employment), despite a signed admission of guilt – the University had swiftly, and inexplicably, moved to suppress our public identification of the man.
The Honi Soit editorial team stands by our decision to make public the perpetrator, particularly given the manifest failings of the University’s handling and the inability of the woman to even access the criminal justice system, due to a six-month limitation period.

We believed – and continue to believe – the woman did not receive justice. We believe this was made clear in her account to Honi. We consulted with her before we published details, which identified the perpetrator.

Campus should be a safe space for all students. For the past eight months, the University failed the woman. Today, the University failed all victims of sexual harassment and abuse. It chose to side with someone who disrespected another’s consent in a moment of vulnerability. It sent a message: victims will not find justice from it, but perpetrators will find protection.

Honi Soit
Honi Soit is the weekly student newspaper of the University of Sydney. It has a proud reputation of being the most vibrant and prestigious student publication in Australia.
  • Tony

    Hope he sues you and bankrupts you, disgraceful hateful people

    • Shiran

      oh yea, the people demanding justice for the victim of a sex crime are the ‘disgraceful’ and ‘hateful’ ones. nice logic there.

    • Orion

      Sues for what? Factually accurate statements?

  • Alice Black

    keep up the great work guys

    • jend

      No

    • Marla

      Agreed.

  • Jesus

    I doubt Honi really care as much as they claim to. They just want to have a media circus to do their usual “Blame the University for everything”, and now it’s draw so much attention, this post is just them trying to milk it out some more. Remember that it is the SRC that agreed to comply with the universities demand, if SRC and Honi really did cared about the girl and think this is justice, and didn’t think there are any legal grounds, why didn’t they just ignore the complaint.

    • Orion

      No way they could possibly care about a woman with a horror story that could happen to any woman.
      That would be too ridiculous to contemplate

      • Jesus

        If you read over what I said, I never suggested that they don’t care at all. I only question how much of their interest is in milking this incident for their agenda to criticize the university for anything. It’s seems pretty convenient to follow orders and complain about it in a new articles (and generate more views) than to disobey the SRC and University. They say some strong words, and then act like cowards.

  • Guest

    You people are despicable. There was no reason to publish his name in the first place. There was nothing good at all that could have come out of it. You clearly wanted to start a witch hunt.

    You’re absolutely disgusting, vengeful people.

    • Alice Black

      appropriately vengeful you could even say, given the lack of response by both the police and university to a sex crime. The benefit of publishing an article like this is that it may bring so much shame to the university that he finally gets held accountable for his actions.

    • Guest

      Nothing good come of this? Nothing good about drawing attention to the severe lack of support when it comes to reporting sexual misconduct? Nothing good about pointing out that this man is in charge of new residents and students at this university, that he’s in a position of power where he can potentially prey on the vulnerable? Nothing good out of holding him accountable for his actions?

      Right.

      • Guest

        The law holds him accountable for his actions. By starting a shaming campaign against him, and who knows what else, you’re no better than the people in the third world who cut off the hands of thieves.

        • Guest

          But the law hasn’t held him accountable for anything. Also note, I have not once mentioned his name. It’s not the ideal way to have attention drawn to the flaws in the system, but it’s the way it happened, and if it had been dealt with fairly it wouldn’t have come to this in the first place.

        • senyai

          The problem is the law does not hold males to account for their actions. The law is largely a white patriarchy designed to protect powerful white men. In this context public shaming is no different from any legitimate protest action to redress the failures of the system.

      • jend

        oh the same old “we need awareness” bullshit. If you want to showcase the lack of support, you could have done it with or without listing his name.

    • Katie Baker

      Well hopefully in the future, individuals will think twice before committing sexual assault in fear that their crimes may be made public – because, you know, there’s clearly no other incentive to not commit sexual assault.

    • Marla

      I am so glad they did!

  • Guest

    Great fucking work Honi Soit…. “Campus should be a safe space for all students” you say. Yet in the comments I see things like “He lives, works and studies at usyd. DRAG HIM”, and you still disagree with the university’s claims that they should be concerned about his safety? I don’t understand. And then you are ordered to remove his name from your website, but you don’t even bother to clear out any of the comments mentioning his full name or where he works and lives from your website.

    You don’t even care about the physical or emotional safety of this person do you? This is just disgraceful Honi Soit. Very fucking disgraceful…

    • Orion

      You don’t even care about her.
      $5 says she gets more reprisal directed at her for this article than he does for his confession.

      • Guest

        Where in the post do I say that? It isn’t even implied. The post focuses on a single point – the safety of the accused. I do think what happened to her was wrong, it’s sad that anything like that happened. However, judging from the comments on this website and social media, I am concerned about his safety.

        Take your false accusations elsewhere.

  • waffles

    There’s probably not much point in writing this, since most of you seem to have your minds made up already, but here goes. Also IANAL so apologies if I get any of the terminology wrong :)

    This is not a “sex crime”, at least according to NSW law. It also has nothing to do with the patriachy, victim blaming, rape culture or any or the other issues that are trivialised by bringing them up in irrelevant contexts such as this.

    When the photo was originally taken, it was an offence under section 91J (‘Voyeurism’) of the NSW Crimes Act. Unfortunately, this is considered a ‘summary’ offence, meaning (amongst other things) that the charges must be brought to bear within 6 months of the offence occurring. It is extremely unfortunate that the law is this way, but it is what it is. If you disagree with this, then the correct outlet for your anger is your local MP (please be civil!), *not* the dude who took the picture.

    Regarding the dude allegedly sharing the photo with others and gossiping about it: once again, this is a failing of our law system, and not of the uni or the police or anyone else. Australia has extremely poor laws regarding personal privacy, to the point where there is no offence covering a breach of privacy such as this (and therefore not a lot you can really do about it legally speaking). Once again, you need to contact your local MP if you’re dissatisfied with this and would like things to change.

    Publishing the guy’s name and details was extremely poor form on the part of Honi because, as stated, he hasn’t been formally charged (let alone convicted) with anything. Hopefully I don’t need to explain why it’s pure insanity to lay down punishments against people without a proper investigation and trial?

    Edit: TL;DR,
    1. Go here: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/qanda/find-your-local-mp.htm
    2. Find the MP for your area.
    3. Find some polite way of saying: “NSW’s privacy laws fucking suck! Please fix!”
    4. In descending order or effectiveness: phone, mail, fax (lol) or email your thoughts.

    • Guest

      So… it’s not a university matter if a woman is being harassed at her university, by her university peers, after one of these peers shared photos of her without consent? And it has nothing to do with the university that they’ve hired him to be responsible for students in campus accommodation? Even though he has admitted he distributed her photo, and the university grudgingly acknowledged this too with their half-hearted attempts at mediation?

      Ok.

      • Tony

        It’s not the responsibility of the university to make judgements on criminal matters. That is what the courts and the law are for. The defendant here, if punished by the university, should have full legal recourse for suing them for discrimination given that he has not been convicted of a crime.

        so, both legally and ethically, the answer to your question is YES, IT IS NOT A UNIVERSITY MATTER

        And it’s especially not a matter for the vigilante justice loving, man hating “journalists” on Honi Solt. I would really love to see charges brought up over this. Such a morally degenerate rag written by pathetic excuses for human beings.

        • Guest

          We’ve already established that the legal system is bullshit. It’s a university matter because he is in breach of the University’s Code of Conduct for students.

          • jend

            Sorry move out of Aus if you think the legal system is bullshit. If you like taking extra legal actions why not lynch him? That’s the idiocy of your agenda

          • senyai

            Our entire democracy is built on people taking direct actions when they thought the system was unfair. Strikes, civil disobedience etc. Perhaps we should have said to Gandhi or MLK or Mandela…”sorry mate, if you think the system is unfair just talk to your MP”. As for suggesting that people who don’t like the “system”, should leave the country, that is patently absurd. If you did that we could start with all the so-called pillars of society (Rinehart anyone) who don’t like e.g, taxation, minimum wages etc.

          • Guest

            I’m not advocating lynching the guy. I just think there is more the university could have done about a BREACH OF STUDENT CODE OF CONDUCT especially when he’s in a liaison position, considering he has done this. That is my problem.

            And the legal system is hardly balanced, if you take a look at some of the punishments and how lax they are in comparison to actions perpetrated. But that’s a different matter and since you’re telling me to leave the country because I am unhappy with what’s considered ‘justice’ in some areas, I’m not going to waste my time on explaining that to you.

        • Kyle Solomon

          Hey Tony,

          Brave guy like you I imagine you’re proud of your views, what’s your full name? Mine is Kyle Solomon.

          • Guest

            You look like a complete loser man, have you ever touched a barbell before? Bet you’re proud of being a pussy whipped feminine idiot. Why the fuck would I put my name towards something that is going to draw me heat from feminists? Have fun with your flabby girlfriend, you sad fuck.

          • Guest

            Is this something you always do? Make ridiculous personal attacks on people?

          • Kyle Solomon

            Haha. Classic. Takes a real man to anonymously post in a comment thread.

        • A Person

          Nope. You are utterly incorrect.

          The University By-Laws, Harassment and Discrimination Policy, and Student Code of Conduct all lay out how misconduct is investigated, determined and disciplined.

          Chapter 8 of the by-laws states:
          76 Making a determination
          (1) The Vice-Chancellor or a Board may, after hearing an allegation of misconduct against a student:
          (a) make a finding that the student is guilty of misconduct but impose no penalty, or
          (b) impose one or more penalties on the student if satisfied that the student is guilty of misconduct.

          Division 6 Penalties

          77 Penalties that may be imposed
          (1) One or more of the following penalties may be imposed under this Chapter in respect of misconduct by a student:
          (a) expulsion from the University,
          (b) suspension from admission to or from the use of University grounds or any part of those grounds, either permanently or for a specified period,
          (c) suspension from a University course either permanently or for a specified period,
          (d) a fine,
          (e) a reprimand or a severe reprimand,
          (f) a penalty in accordance with academic usage.
          (2) The Vice-Chancellor or a Board, when imposing a penalty, may suspend the operation of that penalty on such terms as may be determined by the Vice-Chancellor or Board.

      • waffles

        Please try to be civil. Sarcasm and dry wit are not actually very effective tools in trying to prove your point.

        Obviously (hopefully?) the university has some interest in making sure students feel comfortable at the uni. This is why there are policies on things such as student conduct. What you have to consider here is that (quite horribly!) there is no crime that is considered to have been commited in this situation and as such there is extraordinarily little the university can do about it. Expelling the student or dismissing him from his position would likely be illegal as there are strict laws for when these actions can or cannot be taken.

        • Guest

          I’m sorry if that came across as uncivil to you, but I am honestly trying to get my head around this. I don’t understand why it has to be so complicated.

          If nothing else he breached the Student code of conduct. That girl has been suffering months of humiliation that, let’s face it, won’t stop here. I would think that his position would require some degree of empathy and understanding of what his responsibilities are and that he would be obligated, more than anyone else, to adhere to the Student Code of Conduct. Which, he hasn’t. So I don’t see what the problem is in removing him from that position, at the very least.

          • waffles

            No harm done :)

            The thing that absolutely needs to be stressed here is that this whole situation is a failing of our legal system. As far as I can gather, the law treats sharing a nude photo as equivalent to sharing a photo of someone’s dog or sharing someone’s date of birth. There’s just no legal basis behind the idea of a ‘breach of privacy’.

            Additionally, in Australia we *do* have decent laws surrounding things like unfair dismissal. They may not relate 100% here depending on the nature of the dude’s position, but it’s entirely possible that if they did try to force him out then he would have grounds for legal action against the uni.

            I took a quick look at the student code of conduct and whilst it does suggest that expulsion or suspension or whatever could be a valid measure in this case, they could run into similar problems if the guy wanted to fight them. I mean just look at all the stuff Tom Raue gets away with. Wasn’t the uni only able to actually suspend him when he outright assaulted someone?

        • casebash

          “Expelling the student or dismissing him from his position would likely be illegal as there are strict laws for when these actions can or cannot be taken.” Could you go into more detail about what these restrictions are? Are these legislation or are these university policies themselves?

          • waffles

            I replied to a Guest down / that way in more detail. I think a good summary is to think about Tom Raue. He seems to break the student code of conduct a whole bunch, but he gets away with it most of the time. Why? Because he’s very litigious and trying to prove in court that they’ve got a valid reason to suspend him is more trouble than it’s worth.

        • A Person

          This is incorrect. The University has plenty of scope to take action where no crime has been committed for all matters relating to student misconduct, including academic misconduct and breach of the Student Code of Conduct, University By-Laws and Bullying/Harassment policies.

        • A Person

          The University By-Laws, Harassment and Discrimination Policy, and Student Code of Conduct all lay out how misconduct is investigated, determined and disciplined.

          Chapter 8 of the by-laws states:
          76 Making a determination
          (1) The Vice-Chancellor or a Board may, after hearing an allegation of misconduct against a student:
          (a) make a finding that the student is guilty of misconduct but impose no penalty, or
          (b) impose one or more penalties on the student if satisfied that the student is guilty of misconduct.

          Division 6 Penalties

          77 Penalties that may be imposed
          (1) One or more of the following penalties may be imposed under this Chapter in respect of misconduct by a student:
          (a) expulsion from the University,
          (b) suspension from admission to or from the use of University grounds or any part of those grounds, either permanently or for a specified period,
          (c) suspension from a University course either permanently or for a specified period,
          (d) a fine,
          (e) a reprimand or a severe reprimand,
          (f) a penalty in accordance with academic usage.
          (2) The Vice-Chancellor or a Board, when imposing a penalty, may suspend the operation of that penalty on such terms as may be determined by the Vice-Chancellor or Board.

  • Guest

    It’s funny how minor this issue is – it’s just a nude/sex photo that was shared around. Feminists like to say that 1/4 in women will be sexually assaulted during their time at university, so you would think there would be thousands of reports of it every year and lots of material for Honi Soit to publish. But nothing.

    And so this one little incident comes about and it’s been given hundreds of shares on social media and effectively had calls to lynch the perpetrator. It just shows that sexual assault isn’t as common of a thing as feminists like to say it is.

    • Tony

      The thing I find amusing is that most of these girls here who are so outraged are in fact immensely ugly. It’s like they work up this hurricane of misinformation with each other that everyone is desperate to rape them, when the truth is that you couldn’t pay a significant portion of people to think twice about hooking up with them. The normal/athletic/good looking girls get on with their lives and don’t spend all day whinging about mythical oppression. PS I wonder how many guys at sydney uni have had their nude photos shared by college girls… where is the Honi Solt article on that, because I guarantee you that number is not zero.

      • Guest

        For Christ’s sake. It’s not about being ‘ugly’ or ‘athletic’ or ‘good looking’. It’s about having photos posted about the place without consent and the sheer lack of respect and humiliation that follows.

    • Guest

      ‘It’s just a nude sex photo that was shared about’

      Women don’t report as often as it happens because they are constantly humiliated and intimidated into keeping to themselves. Your quaint dismissal of something that can often turn into a drawn out, harrowing experience just goes to show how ingrained this inconsiderate attitude is.

      • Guest

        If you knew how to read properly you would see I didn’t dismiss anything.

        • Guest

          “It’s funny how *minor* this issue is”
          “It’s *just* a nude sex photo that was shared around”
          I call that pretty dismissive.

          • Guest

            I’m pointing out that it’s not as bad as rape, which feminists would have you believe happens to a quarter of the women at our university (it doesn’t). I’m pointing out how “rape culture” is a lie.

          • Marla

            You’re not doing much of the sort.

  • Alex

    The authors have also clearly decided to take the law into their own hands and mete out a punishment that they deem acceptable.

    I do not condone the man’s actions. Not in the slightest. But what the article has done is expose this guy as being a proper dumb male.

    Yes, justice and equality are worthy causes for a publication to stand up for, especially when an organisation as large as a university is failing its students so spectacularly. While I applaud the culture shift this is aiding, it will be at the great, great expense of this one chap who was likely trying to be “one of the lads”. Unfortunately for him, it just so happens that such a stance is now viewed by the other larger, more progressive side of society as really not ok. This individual who is being put in the spotlight is very unlucky in his position on the other side of that fence. In such a context, I think the actions of the publication in making an example of this solitary male doing what the dumb male minority continue to do because they’re trying to fit into their shrinking herd… Well, it feels like a rather rash move.

  • Guest

    Also to be fair, I lived on Darlington road last year and knew the guy, I also know people who still live on the road and who are in touch with him, your article says he hasn’t received any kind of punishment, but I have heard directly from those people that he did actually get a suspension.

  • rhajastan

    I posted this comment on the original article, and I will repost it here:

    To be fair, I lived on Darlington road last year and knew the guy, I also know people who still live on the road and who are in touch with him, your article says he hasn’t received any kind of punishment, but I have heard directly from those people that he did actually get a suspension. I might be wrong, so feel free to fact check that, but if I’m right… well, it does sort of take some of the wind out of the whole thing.

    Don’t get me wrong I think what he’s done (though i don’t know the whole story) is disgusting. but I do think calling for him to expelled is over the top. As much as my sympathy goes to the victim in this case, its also true that in time this whole thing will blow over. that by no means excuses mr. prick from getting his just deserts, but lets not fall into the trap of making one guy a scapegoat.

    This sort of shit is horrible, and people are right to get angry about it, but it’s unacceptable to take ALL of that anger out on one person. I have no problem with saying that he should be punished, but getting hate mail and threats (yes, that has been happening) is not the punishment he deserves.

    so yes, this article definitely ought to have been redacted. no scratch that, he should have never been outed publicly like this in the first place. It fine to get people angry about an issue like this, but to open someone ( pig or not) to the anger of an entire community is just silly.

    the whole concept of ‘naming and shaming’ is nothing more that kindergarten justice, which is why its only dished out by journalists and not judges.

    try to remember that we’re talking about a stupid immature kid, not the spawn of satan.

    and for god’s sake don’t accuse me of victim blaming or not being a feminist just because I refuse to become part of a lynch mob, and object to callous way your article went about creating one.

    In conclusion, to paraphrase Seab “solidarity with the victim” but can we please also avoid bringing more hate into the world. Who knows, maybe this guy legitimately feels bad for what he’s done (he is a fucking human being after all), punish him by all mean, but its really not your place to go all vigilante and give everyone his name and address.

    • Wilson

      I love that people always start arguments centering around “scape goating”, spreading “hate” or being “over the top” by first, just slightly acknowledging that what happened to the victim was not okay. Stop there and reflect. Reflect on the fact that this girl has been humiliated, her body has been put on display without her consent, for months, and she has received no justice for it.

      This is not an issue just relevant to this guy, but just because people get away with this stuff all the time doesn’t mean that they should. He shouldn’t get away with it. No one should. ‘Naming and shaming’ is an easy way to forget the consequences of his actions. His apology does not delete them. If the same sort of waffle was used to justify child abuse or rape, we would be living in a very problematic society (more than it already is). Honi is not trying to be a vigilante, it is simply shedding light on the issue that has largely been ignored by many already. So, the lynch mob exists both ways: the one that does acknowledge and do something about the wrongdoings of this man, and the one that doesn’t and cries “scape goat!”

      • rhajastan

        firstly, read the first paragraph again, I trust the people I know, who know him, probably have more of the facts that who ever wrote this, so I legitimately believe that HE GOT A SUSPENSION. boom punishment. sure he wasn’t drawn and quartered which might be what you wanted. but its punishment none the less. making the whole premise of the article [uni fails to punish perpetrator] invalid.

        secondly, ‘just slightly acknowledging’. are you kidding me, I said it was disgusting, i called him a prick and a pig, i can’t make my disdain for the guy MORE obvious. lets not even bother talking about the difference between someone sharing a photo with their friends and the recent, similar (though much more extreme) example of having your phone hacking and pictures spread across the whole fucking internet. lets just accept that there is a difference, and the scope of the punishment ought to fit the scope of the crime

        Your right to say that This is not an issue just relevant to this guy, So why the fuck should he become the focus of all of our pent up anger regarding the assholes who do this stuff.

        “he shouldn’t get away with it”- see the first part about how HE GOT A FUCKING SUSPENSION, what more do you want? (oh right you want him to be outed publicly so he can receive hate mail and threats from every self righteous reader wanting to release some anger despite the fact that its none of their goddamned business.

        “‘Naming and shaming’ is an easy way to forget the consequences of his actions” – legit not sure if your on crack here…. yeah i… this doesn’t even make sense. I mean, if i was publicly outed, getting hate mail and threats (yeah it bears repeating) i sure as hell wouldn’t be forgetting anything.

        “His apology does not delete them [his actions]” – ontologically correct i suppose, but are you saying that all apologies are worthless? are you saying he shouldn’t have bothered to apologise at all?

        “If the same sort of waffle was used to justify child abuse or rape, we would be living in a very problematic society (more than it already is).” – WOAH now, slow down cowboy, way to namedrop some reeeeal heavy shit in a poor attempt to give your own barely coherent point some weight.

        “Honi is not trying to be a vigilante, it is simply shedding light on the issue that has largely been ignored by many already.” – lets assume for a second that the guy didn’t GET A FUCKING SUSPENSION (again, it bears repeating) by all means shed light on how shit the university is, but the second you tell people his name, give them a photo of him, and casually drop his address in to boot, you’ve done made yourself a vigilante son.

        “the lynch mob exists both ways: the one that does acknowledge and do something about the wrongdoings of this man” – …yes, thats what a lynch mob is and they are bad. also, “do” something!? please please please nobody take it upon them selves to “do” something to this guy, yeah he’s a shit we get it but again HE GOT A FUCKING SUSPENSION.

        “and the one that doesn’t and cries “scape goat!”” – yeah in case you didnt realise, I acknowledge that he did wrongdoings and is an asshole and all that, but when people start walking around saying oh we all need, not just to do something about this issue, but to DO SOMETHING TO THIS GUY SPECIFICALLY (like i dunno? irresponsibly oust him on a public forum and create a lynch mob in the process maybe?) when that happens i absolutely reserve the right to say ” hey lets not make this guy a scapegoat”

        • Wilson

          HAHA dude, I love how worked up you’re getting on behalf of “poor (REDACTED” there.

          WOW he got a suspension everybody, go home!!! calm down, you’re being hysterical!!! HE GOT A SUSPENSION, DIDN’T YOU HEAR??

          As if getting a fucking suspension is ever going to erase what he did. you’re right actually – his apology means nothing. Consider anyone who commits a crime and then says ‘sorry’ – the law doesn’t let them get off scot-free. A ‘suspension’ in the accommodation he was living at means shit all, considering he walks around uni, still sees the girl, and trust me – i’ve also heard personal accounts of this fellow – has the audacity to still wink at her. So unless you want to disregard her experience, stop carrying on with your “but suspension!!!” protest.

          “lets just accept that there is a difference, and the scope of the punishment ought to fit the scope of the crime” Yeah sure buddy – this punishment doesn’t, and if you’re the fucking judge here on that we’re all doomed.

          Yes, a suspension is not a good enough consequence. Clearly, the victim herself is unhappy with the way her situation has been handled. So who are you to jump to this guy’s defence? Yes, defence, considering you want everyone to back off because – wait for it – ‘suspension!!!”

          • rhajastan

            hey buddy, I knew the guy personally alright, im not ‘poor alexing’ anyone, hes a prick, and if he does still wink at her, then he’s a fucking asshole.

            and i know his apology wont erase what he did, but then again not one goddamn thing in this whole would universe will. so its a moot point

            I’m not the judge of when a punishment fits the crime, but by the same token, neither are you, and neither is honi soit. so i love that you take it upon yourself to say in the very next paragraph that its NOT a good enough punishment, who’s being the judge now?

            and so what if I’m coming to his defence, it doesn’t mean that i approve of what he did, i doesn’t mean I have any less sympathy for the victim. it DOES mean that I find the idea of someones personal details being released to angry public abhorrent, but im sure as hell not going to apologise for that.

            im calling honi out on publishing his name photo and address.

            lets say he gets bashed next week – i mean, you apparently know more than me about when a punishment is fitting, would that be fitting do you think?

            now in all likelihood that wont happen (thank god), but it doesn’t change the fact that it was some fucking irresponsible shit for honi to publish.

  • Rohan Kirkpatrick

    Well, geniuses, if you print his name with the claims, and without supporting evidence, you’re absolutely guaranteeing that no action *can* be taken legally. You’ve prejudiced any legal proceedings from the get go. Ever heard of trial by media? Clearly not.

    Furthermore – such actions encourage others in future to act unilaterally. You might feel in this instance the guy was guilty. But maybe someone follows your example in future – and the person isn’t guilty and they get injured or worse as a result of vigilantism and witch-hunt mentality.

    If you want to be journalists; act with a modicum of responsibility instead of hungrily using outrage to fund page hits. Also, FFS read the law on the issue, because like it or not, it is slander.

    The lack of research done on this article is appalling. “It may constitute a crime” – well why don’t you fucking check?

  • rhajastan

    just gonna put this out there again for everyone who reckons this article is about getting justice for the victim. yes the guys is a wanker but apparently the good people at honi soit didnt do much research because guess what!? HE FUCKING GOT SUSPENDED!

  • matilda

    C’mon, the survivor has had to live with people remembering her in ways she doesn’t want for months and months, while he gets off with no punishment and no shame – yet – so let’s do what we can to fix that grotesque miscarriage of justice and remember the man (REDACTED) and his violation of a woman’s sexual autonomy and personal privacy : ~)

    • rhajastan

      yeah! he got to do something bad so we should all do bad things too to get back at him.

      disgraceful.

  • jend

    The problem with Hoit Soit is that you think by objecting to public shaming we are endorsing the action of the perpetrator. This is wrong. We don’t take sides. He was wrong and so are you, Christina White.

  • rhajastan

    look at it this way – because of what he did, he put this girl through a hellish experience, and because honi published his personal details, he’s been put through a hellish experience [threats hate mail etc.]. Saying that thats okay is akin to saying that if i went out right now and raped a rapist, it wouldn’t count as rape. NO. FUCKING. DICE.

  • Marla

    Amazing work Honi, people should not have to go through this sort of pain to report harassment and assault. When I reported sexual harassment by the photo technician at Sydney College of the Arts (USyd) I received counselling, they did interviews, and due to other incidents he was subsequently fired. I suspect that the help I got then from student services was entirely due to it occurring before VSU.

  • Cabletie

    Next step for Honi – blaming Usyd for the Ebola outbreak after it was discovered the VC read about it in the newspaper and didn’t go over and cure it himself – you know, since apparently EVERYTHING is his job…

  • http://honisoit.com/ Honi Soit

    We’ve been directed by the SRC to temporarily hide comments identifying the perpetrator by full name. Currently, no legal action has been commenced against Honi or the SRC.

    A University spokesperson said in a statement today that they “requested” the SRC remove the perpetrator’s name and photo following concerns for his safety and privacy.

    • Guest

      As you should have a long time ago

      • http://honisoit.com/ Honi Soit

        Run for Honi.

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