Ad for Henry Halloran Lecture
Comedy //

Comedians see no light at end of nuclear tunnel

Sydney University comedians have failed to make light of the impending nuclear apocalypse. Although North Korea has historically been the punchline of many jokes, SU comedians have decided that the potential millions of deaths is too grave for humour. “How can one make a joke about the possible annihilation of Japan and South Korea?” comedian…

15_19_04_383_file

Sydney University comedians have failed to make light of the impending nuclear apocalypse. Although North Korea has historically been the punchline of many jokes, SU comedians have decided that the potential millions of deaths is too grave for humour.
“How can one make a joke about the possible annihilation of Japan and South Korea?” comedian Jai Ahmed asked. “Our job is to make people laugh, not profit off the tragedy of the break of international relations. Kim Jong-Un should be condemned, not to be excused through humour.”
“We’re human beings, not monsters,” another comedian, Christy Ainsworth, noted.
This comes a week after stand-up comedian Harry Wright broke down on stage at a Manning Bar comedy night after attempting a joke about global warming.
“Has anyone ever noticed how global warming sounds like … fuck this, most of Asia is going to drown and I’m here making jokes about the fate of all these people. What have I become?”
There has been backlash from a section of patrons, some commenting on the Sydney University Comedy Association (SUCA) Facebook page demanding a return to jokes about genocide and poverty.
Despite backlash, SUCA is still considering proposals to regulate its members to only make sexually-related jokes at SUCA affiliated venues.
But a faction with SUCA has demanded an end to sex jokes as well, noting that “sex is the greatest catastrophe of the human condition,” in their manifesto.
“La petite mort.”

Filed under: