Students Representative Council, University of Sydney
Reviews //

REVIEW: Queer Revue 2019 “Dead Bi Morning”

Queer Revue 2019 delivers a standout night that balances hilarious comedy with thoughtful realism

Photography by  Harriet Jane Photography by Harriet Jane

Speaking from the bitter perspective of a rejected auditionee for Sydney Universities 2019 Queer* Revue, I must admit, I was hoping not to enjoy the show as much as I did. In fact, I was in search of even one moment that would have given me a satisfying boost as I concluded that the show was not a great success. And yet, I failed. Queer* Revue is a tour de force of everything you could want from a hilarious night out at the theatre, and some.

Expertly directed by the Holy Trinity of Chloe Farrington, Ruby Innes and Aiden Magro, ‘Dead Bi Morning’ is a side splitting addition to Sydney University’s long line of powerhouse Queer* Revues. Held in the intimate space of the Seymour Centre’s Reginald Theatre, the show begins with a smashing musical introduction from the Queer* Revue Band that builds upon the brilliant set design (including a two-meter tall book) by Alex Buist. It’s a full house, and everyone is buzzing with anticipation. The lights black out and the audience begins to scream; everybody seems to know somebody on the stage, and there is an immediate sense of community.

We are brought into a scene from a classic crime thriller novel, each with their respective archetypes played hysterically by the cast. As the audience, we are left in a constant state of excitement, as the fast pacing of the skits and the swift transitions see new characters emerge from behind the sets, above the stage and behind the audience! Speaking of characters, some of the skits contained standout performances from its actors. This included the murderous widow played by Emilia McGrath; the melodramatic movie star played by Rosie Grace, and of course the riotously quick-witted detective played by Misha Campbell. Of the endless noteworthy scenes that left the audience in stitches, one in particular worth mentioning is the ‘Gay William Shakespeare’ scene. Special shoutout to Finn Bryson, Adam Torres and Luke West for bringing the house down with their rendition of Shakespeare’s long lost sonnet, containing some poetic phrases that need to be heard in the flesh.

Directors Farrington, Innes and Magro effectively craft an inclusive show that makes sure it expands across much of the LGBTIQA+* community, something that was lacking within the UTS Queer Revue, which failed to touch on trans-inclusive topics. ‘Dead Bi Morning’ also broaches complex topics of sexuality, identity and gender with ease, switching effortlessly between hilarious comedy and thoughtful realism to ensure the ongoing plight of the LGBTIQA+* community in Australia is equally recognised. But I can assure you; you will never see another show where, within the space of a few minutes, you witness nudity and the transference of saliva from one mouth to another, as well as a forthright critique of Sydney University’s involvement in the Ramsay Centre.

Sydney University’s 2019 Queer* Revue ‘Dead Bi Morning’ is a delight to the senses, expertly balancing education with comedy in a way that is accessible for all audience members. You are left with a closing musical number that will warm your heart, reminding you of the values that are most desperately needed at this time in Australia: unity, acceptance and compassion.

I urge anyone and everyone to snap up a remaining ticket to this beautiful little show. Wonderfully executed and performed, ‘Dead Bi Morning’ is not worth missing!

‘Dead Bi Morning’ is running from the 2nd to the 4th of May in the Reginald Theatre, Seymour Centre, 7pm. Tickets range from $18-22 and can be purchased online at https://www.seymourcentre.com/events/event/dead-bi-morning/ or over the phone (02) 9351 7940.